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Swimming pool water must undergo treatment, in order to remain clear and clean, free from harmful substances, bacteria, viruses, algae and other pathogens and suitable for use by swimmers.

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CHLORE 65% AND 90% "TABLETS-POWDER"

  • Chlorine is one of the most important chemicals as far as swimming pools are concerned.
  • Chlorine is a stabilised liquid chlorine solution suitable for the disinfection of Potable water supplies and Swimming Pools.
  • may be used for any application where it is necessary to maintain a continuous chlorine residual. Typical applications include treatment of drinking water storage tanks, cooling towers, swimming pools etc.
  • The dosage rate of chlorine will be dependent on the required chlorine residual, the chlorine demand of the water and volume to be treated.

ALGAE CONTROL

  • Algae control (algaecides) play an important role. They can be used as an algae-cide to kill small, isolated blooms, but most perform best as an algae-stat, to control and prevent pool algae growth. Pool algaecides are formulated to kill all algae types, but some control certain strains of pool algae better than others, and different algaecides each have their own way of controlling algae.
  • Algaecides function as microbial disinfectants, by attaching themselves to negatively charged algae cells. Once attached, they dissolve the outer protective membranes.

FLOCCULENT

  • Flocculant, or pool floc as it’s sometimes called, is a chemical that you add to your pool when other methods of clearing it up aren’t working.
  • The flocculants clump together floating particles in the water that are too small and light to sink to the bottom to be vacuumed up. Those particles usually include stuff like bacteria, viruses, algae spores, and other microscopic debris.
  • Even though it’s your pool filter’s job to filter this junk out, if the particles are microscopic, they can stay suspended in the water for a long time.
  • When you pour the floc in the pool, it attracts all this stuff and makes it clump together in big chunks so it’s heavy enough to sink to the bottom of the pool, where either it will be sucked toward the filter or you can vacuum it up with your pool cleaner.

CYANURIC ACID

  • Cyanuric acid  is a type of chemical compound called a triazine, which simply means it contains three nitrogen atoms and three carbon atoms. Other triazines include polyurethane resins, herbicides, and disinfectants. Cyanuric acid is a precursor to those, meaning what you put in your pool is not the same substance you use to kill dandelions in your driveway.
  •  Cyanuric acid is sometimes abbreviated as CYA, and it’s also called pool stabilizer, pool conditioner, or chlorine stabilizer. It’s sold in liquid or granule form. You can even get it mixed in with chlorine tablets or sticks, called trichlor, and in chlorine shock, called dichlor.
  • These combination products are referred to as stabilized chlorine because the stabilizer is mixed right in with the sanitizer, saving you the trouble of measuring and adding them separately.

pH ADJUSTMENT

It is important to use the Acid or Base Demand Procedure to help determine how much chemical you need to add to the pool water to achieve the desired results.
·         SODA ASH TO  RAISE THE pH LEVEL 
·         POOL ACID TO LOWER pH LEVEL

pH is the single most important element in swimming pool water chemistry. It affects every other chemical balance in pool water. 

pH is a measure of hydrogen ion (H+) concentration in water. It indicates the relative acidity or basicity of pool water. pH is measured on a scale of 0 (strong acid) to 14 (strong base) with 7 being the neutral pH.

In pools a slightly alkaline pH of 7.2 to 7.6 is most desirable because this range is most comfortable to the human eye and provides for optimum use of free chlorine while maintaining water that is not corrosive or scale forming.

pH MUST BE MAINTAINED BETWEEN 7.2 AND 7.6

The most desirable level for pH is between 7.2 and 7.6

If pH is too low – run alkali demand test if available. Raise pH by adding soda ash (sodium carbonate). Never add more than 2 lbs per 10,000 gallons in a single treatment. Be sure the pump is running when chemicals are added. Allow to recirculate then retest to determine if further treatment is necessary. Caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) is sometimes used with chemical feed pumps to raise pH. If problems with low pH persist, it may be necessary to raise total alkalinity to stabilize the pH.

IF pH IS TOO LOW (BELOW 7)
  • Water becomes acidic
  • Chlorine residuals dissipate rapidly
  • Eye irritation occurs
  • Plaster walls are etched
  • Metal fittings, pump impeller, heater core may corrode
  • Dissolved metals may leave stains on walls
  • Rapid Loss of alkalinity
IF pH IS TOO HIGH (ABOVE 8)
  • Chlorine activity is slowed and inefficient
  • Scale formation and discoloration of pool walls
  • Water becomes cloudy
  • Filter is overworked
  • Eye irritation may occur

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